Rethinking Domestic Violence Policy

Domestic violence policy in Australia is traditionally informed by a feminist view. There is an alternative view that may dramatically reduce the incidence of domestic violence.


The feminist view is is that women are the victims of domestic violence and men are the aggressors. It is strongly supported by data obtained from police and court documents, and from interviews conducted in womens shelters.



The alternative view is that men and women are equally likely to initiate violence in domestic settings. This view is strongly supported by data obtained from sources other than police and court documents or womens refuge interviews.


Resource allocation: Male: {{maleProportion}}% Female: {{femaleProportion}}%
Spending multiple: {{spend}}

Current Policy

Current policy assumes women are the victims of domestic violence and men are the aggressors. This assumption leads to allocating resources entirely to reducing male initiated violence in domestic situations. Current policy demonstrates some success in reducing injuries, but it runs into a limit. No matter how many resources are expended, it can never reduce injuries below this limit.

Try it now with the interactive model above. Set the resource allocation to 100% male and increase the spending multiple to maximum. The best result possible under this policy is a 50% reduction in injuries.

Suggested Policy

The suggested policy assumes men and women are equally likely to initiate violence in domestic settings. This assumption leads to allocating resources equally to reducing male initiated and female initiated violence in domestic situations. Even a small shift in allocation away from 100% to either gender can reduce injuries below the 50% limit without additional spending.

Try it now with the interactive model above. Set the resource allocation to 95% male and 5% female. Now increase the spending multiple to maximum. The suggested policy can reduce injuries below the limit of current policy without additional spending. The best possible result occurs when 50% is allocated to reducing violence initiated by each gender.